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After Irma: Florida governor says nursing home 'failed...basic duty' in deaths

Operators of a Florida nursing home where eight seniors died last week called Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s cell phone four times after Hurricane Irma knocked out the facility’s air conditioning, Scott’s office confirmed Tuesday — but the governor’s office said managers never indicated patients were in danger or needed to be evacuated.

>> Read more trending news

Every call from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills to Scott’s phone was returned by a state official, said the governor’s office, which said nursing home managers were “advised by the state multiple times to call 911 if they had any reason to believe that any lives were in danger – something they failed to do.”

Scott’s office late Tuesday released 159 pages of phone logs, emails and other records related to the state’s interaction with the facility, which is under criminal investigation for the deaths. A ninth victim died Monday, the Broward County Medical Examiner’s Office reported.

The nursing home has blamed state officials and Florida Power & Light for the deaths and released its own timeline last week of calls to FP&L and state agencies.

FP&L last week released a statement, saying it is “limited in what we can say” because of the investigation but adding that “there was a hospital with power across the parking lot from this facility and that the nursing home was required to have a permanently installed, operational generator…we urge our customers who have electricity dependent medical needs, and who don’t have power to call 911, if it is a life-threatening situation.”

>> Related: Owner of nursing home where 8 died linked to Medicare fraud case

With Republican Scott expected to challenge Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson next year, Democrats have intensified efforts to link the governor to the nursing home deaths.

Nelson, in a Senate floor speech Monday, mentioned the nursing home deaths and “all the phone calls that had been made that were not answered, both to the government as well as to the power company.”

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee on Tuesday accused Scott of a “failure to respond” to requests for help from the nursing home’s administrators.

Scott is pushing back hard against his critics.

“No amount of finger pointing by the Hollywood Hills Rehabilitation Facility and Larkin Community Hospital Behavioral Health Services will hide the fact that this healthcare facility failed to do their basic duty to protect life,” Scott said in a statement released Tuesday night. “This facility is failing to take responsibility for the fact that they delayed calling 911 and made the decision to not evacuate their patients to one of the largest hospitals in Florida, which is directly across the street.”

Scott’s office said the governor gave a personal cell phone number before the hurricane to “mayors, sheriffs, police chiefs, county and city officials, nursing homes, ALFs and fuel and utility providers.”

After Irma passed through Broward County on Sunday, Sept. 10, and knocked out the nursing home’s air conditioning, an aide to the governor retrieved a voice mail message at 7:35 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 11 from Natasha Anderson, the CEO of Larkin Community Hospital Behavioral Health Services, which is associated with the nursing home.

The call was returned about about 9:50 p.m. by Department of Health Chief of Staff Alexis Lambert, the governor’s office said.

“Chief Lambert advised Anderson to call 911 if there was any reason to believe that the health or safety of patients was at risk. The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills reported issues involving air conditioning but did not, at any time during the call, report or indicate that conditions had become dangerous or that the health and safety of their patients was at risk,” Scott’s office said.

According to the nursing home’s timeline, on Monday night “the building was still cool and the spot coolers were in place maintaining required temperatures.”

>> Related: After Irma: Sixty-four Florida nursing homes still without power

The next day, Sept. 12, callers from the Rehabilitation Center left two voice mail messages on Scott’s cell phone that were retrieved at 10:25 a.m. Another voice mail was retrieved at 12:50 p.m., according to the governor’s office timeline.

According to the nursing home’s timeline, it received additional spot coolers from Memorial Regional Hospital at 3:15 p.m. on Sept. 12.

An Agency for Health Care Administration official returned one call to nursing home administrator Jorge Carballo at 4:17 p.m., the governor’s office said. Another AHCA official called Anderson at 4:41 p.m. Both Carballo and Anderson said the nursing home’s “chiller” wasn’t working but that spot coolers and fans were in place, according to the governor’s office, which said neither nursing home official indicated patients were in danger.

About nine hours later, at 1:30 a.m. on Sept. 13, the nursing home says the first victim experienced an elevated heart rate and was taken to the hospital.

Florida Keys hotel in Netflix series ‘Bloodline’ closed in wake of Irma

The Islamorada hotel featured in the Netflix series ‘Bloodline’ is closed indefinitely in the wake of Hurricane Irma.

>> Read more trending news 

Last year, Palm Beach Daily News travel writer Cheryl Blackerby  wrote a piece about her trip to Islamorada and how the Moorings Village and Spa and other Florida Keys locations became stars of the show.

‘Bloodline’ ended earlier this year but is still available on Netflix. Meanwhile, Islamorada and the Keys are trying to recover after being decimated by Irma. As a result, the Moorings announced last week on its website it would not accept reservations for the rest of 2017.

On Sept. 11, the Moorings also posted on its Facebook page: “The security, well-being and safety of our guests and staff is always the highest priority in all emergency situations. Due to the mandatory evacuation of the Florida Keys and ramifications of Hurricane Irma, The Moorings is currently closed and not accepting reservations for the remainder of 2017. Once the storm passes and we can return to the property and assess damage, we will make a decision regarding re-opening. We appreciate your understanding and ask for your patience during this time. Our thoughts remain with all of those affected by the storm.”

Read more at Palm Beach Daily News.

>> PHOTOS: Netflix ‘Bloodline’ series and real life collide in Islamorada

>> PHOTOS: Paradise destroyed in Florida Keys

Hurricane Irma: Officials question Duke Energy about remaining 37K local power outages

Patience is wearing thin for the 37,000 Duke Energy customers in Central Florida who awoke Tuesday morning in homes without electricity.

More than 33,000 local outages remained by Tuesday afternoon.

The company's Seminole County delegation met at downtown Sanford's Seminole County Services Building to question company officials about why so many customers remain without power more than a week after Hurricane Irma blew through Central Florida.

>> Read more trending news

Duke Energy had promised to fully restore power to its customers by midnight Sunday, but it later said efforts wouldn't be complete until 11 p.m. Tuesday. The company blamed an IT issue for delays and miscommunication.

Read: Powerless, frustrated residents enter week 2 as Duke works to restore power

State Rep. Bob Cortes, who attended Tuesday's meeting, said he's disappointed that the company hasn't made good on its initial promise.

"We understand that power restoration after a natural disaster of this magnitude is a Herculean task," Cortes said in a letter to the company. "But Duke Energy's lack of transparency and effective communication about the situation and IT issues is trying its customers' patience and eroding their confidence in Duke's operation."

But Cortes said during Tuesday's meeting that the blame lies with Irma.

Read: Hurricane Irma aftermath: Trash, debris pickup information

Read: Hurricane Irma aftermath: Trash, debris pickup information

Apopka resident Francine Uva said she's been frustrated by the lack of communication.

"You don't really know if it is going to be on," Uva said. "It's not on as of yet, and they promised."

Arthur Archer, who also lives in Apopka, said the storm has cost him greatly.

"My food is gone," he said. "My bank account is disappearing."

Read: Hurricane Irma: Flood warning remains in effect for residents near Lake Harney

Officials said the original deadline wasn't met because electrical systems in some areas were destroyed and because storm debris has blocked access to power lines, especially in areas hit by tornadoes. Thousands of utility poles, transformers and power lines need replacing, they said.

Earlier this week, the company's president apologized for the lengthy outage and said that its customers deserve better. She said that IT issues led to inaccurate reports of restorations.

A Duke Energy representative echoed those sentiments during Tuesday's meeting.

Read: Hurricane Irma: Updates on cable, Wi-Fi restoration

"I'd like to start with an apology," the spokesman said. "We let our customers down."

Duke Energy officials said customers in Seminole and Marion counties would have power restored by 11 p.m. Monday. But on Tuesday afternoon, there were still more than 9,000 outages in those counties.

Read: Hurricane Irma: How to recover lost wages after the storm

Florida's 10 safest cities in a hurricane

There’s really no place that’s 100 percent safe in Florida when it comes to hurricanes.

Even Orlando got hit twice in 2004 by hurricanes Charley and Frances.

>> Read more trending news

And, although Florida enjoyed a more than 10-year hurricane drought after 2005’s Hurricane Wilma, Hurricane Hermine made landfall in the Florida Panhandle in 2016. 

Still, Homeinsurance.com has ranked Florida’s cities based on their evaluation of NOAA-identified storms from 1965 to October 2014, doling out scores based on the number of storm events, number of storm-related deaths, property damage and storm-related injuries.

The top 10 safest cities in Florida during a hurricane, according to the insurance study, are:

  1. Leesburg
  2. Orlando
  3. Sanford
  4. Kissimmee
  5. Palatka
  6. Lake City
  7. Naples
  8. Ocala
  9. Gainesville
  10. Fernandina Beach

The entire ranking is below.

Read more about the Home Insurance study here.

What is storm surge and why is it dangerous?

What is storm surge, how does it happen and why should you be wary of it? Here is a quick look at storm surge.

What is storm surge?

A storm surge is water pushed inland as a hurricane advances and makes landfall.

How does it form?

Imagine a bowl of water. Put your hand in the middle of the bowl and cup it. Now slowly push your hand toward the edge of the bowl. Those are the same dynamics as storm surge. The ocean water is pushed by winds and waves, and is also sucked into the air near the eye of the hurricane by low pressure.

Is it a “wall of water” that rushes in?

Rarely. It is usually a rise of water that can happen quickly, moving at the same rate as the forward speed of a hurricane. 

How powerful is a storm surge?

Very powerful. Only 1 cubic yard of sea water weighs 1,728 pounds. A 6-inch surge can knock a person down.

How dangerous is it?

Storm surge kills more people in a hurricane than all other components of the storm. The overwhelming majority of deaths in the 10 deadliest U.S. landfalling hurricanes were the result of storm surge.

How can I stay safe?

Get away from it. A surge 1 foot deep can take a car off a road. Get out early, because the surge can begin up to 24 hours before landfall. During Hurricane Katrina, people stayed in their homes and died there when the surge filled their homes with water and they could not escape. Also, don’t leave pets at home. Many animals died when people left them in their homes during Hurricane Katrina.

‘Hot single female’ uses creative sign to get electricity back after Hurricane Irma

One Florida woman who lost electricity during Hurricane Irma decided to take an unusual route to get the attention of workers.

Yahoo Lifestyle WFTS reported that Kynse Angles of Fort Myers, Florida, took some pink spray paint and created a sign reading “Hot single female seeks sexy lineman to electrify her life.”

>> Read more trending news

Wearing a pink tank top, white shorts and heels, she posed next to the sign outside and posted the photo on Instagram and Facebook Sunday.

Angles, 37, who has lived with Type 1 diabetes since childhood, had a kidney and pancreas transplant Sept. 1 before the storm.

Angles told Yahoo Lifestyle she was discharged from a Tampa, Florida, hospital too early because of a rush to release patients before the storm. She said she had problems at a nearby hotel and had to spend the storm and several days afterward at the hospital.

“I said, ‘I want my bed. I’m single. It’s hot outside. I need electricity,’” she said.

Angles said she thought the sign would be funny.

“That was my idea. I like to be humorous,” she told Yahoo Life.

“I just thought maybe if a lineman got to my neighborhood they’ll laugh and hook me up first,” Angles told WFTS.

The photo of the sign received hundreds of shares and likes on Facebook.

As it gained traction online, a Fort Myers radio station had Angles on air, which she said also played a big role in regaining power quickly.

It all worked: Later that day, Angles’ power had been restored.

Tolls Still Free In Florida A Week After Irma

Tolls Still Free In Florida A Week After Irma

Fla. Home Partially Swallowed By Possible Sinkhole

Fla. Home Partially Swallowed By Possible Sinkhole

Florida to resume charging tolls after being suspended for Hurricane Irma

UPDATE - Sept. 19: 

Florida authorities said the state will resume charging tolls on its turnpike and other roads and bridges at 12:01 a.m. Thursday after they were suspended during Hurricane Irma.

Original story:

More than a week after Hurricane Irma hit parts of Florida, the state’s tolls are still suspended while cities rebuild and residents return to their homes and repair damages to property, some with the help of friends and family members traveling into the state.

>> Read more trending news 

Others have traveled to the state to volunteer with repair efforts.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott suspended tolls after ordering Floridians to evacuate ahead of the hurricane. Millions of people fled the state. 

Scott wrote on Twitter Monday that tolls would remain suspended as residents and officials “focus on recovery efforts.”

It’s unclear when toll fees will be reinstated, but Scott said he would keep people updated. 

HURRICANE IRMA RELIEF SUPPLY DRIVE

Storm evacuations: How coin, frozen cup of water could keep you from getting sick

If you evacuate because of a storm, here is one thing that you can do to help ensure you and your family members don’t get sick after returning to your home.

>> Read more trending news 

You may have seen this post on your Facebook feed. It suggests to putting a quarter on a cup of frozen water in the freezer before you leave. When you return, you can see if the quarter stayed put or if it sank. The sinking will tell you that the water melted. If the water in the cup melted then refroze, the same can be said for the food in the freezer.

But can you believe all of the tips and hacks you see on Facebook and other social media?

In this case, experts said yes, but with a slight change. 

The Houston Chronicle reported that instead of a quarter, you’ll want to use a penny.

That’s because pennies contain copper and copper is a better conductor of heat, Don Mercer told the Chronicle. Mercer is an associate professor in Food Science at the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada.

Mercer said that food will stay frozen in a freezer for about 24 hours, as long as you don’t open the freezer door to check on what is inside.

The coin/cup trick helps when you’re away and are not sure if there’s been an extended power outage. Mercer said if the contents of the freezer thawed and then refroze, you’d have no way of knowing without the hack. If food thaws then refreezes, microorganisms that were there before the first freeze can multiply, posing a threat of food poisoning. 

Hurricane evacuation: Helpful apps for finding gas, hotel rooms, traffic routes

If you are looking for information needed when evacuating before a storm, here is a list of apps and websites that may help.

For Federal Aviation Administration major airport status, see http://www.fly.faa.gov/flyfaa/semap.jsp.

For gas availability, see GasBuddy at https://www.gasbuddy.com/.

For a map of Xfinity Wi-Fi hot spots, which are located both indoors and outdoors in places such as shopping districts, parks and businesses, visit xfinity.com/wifi.

For traffic slowdowns or wrecks, road closures and other real-time traffic issues, go to Waze.

To find a hotel room, see expedia.com.

If you need information about weather, public alerts, shelters, forecasts and more, go to Google.org’s crisis maps.

If you want money transfer or storm tracking apps, or just want to network, try the App Store’s "Stay Safe After the Hurricane” collection.

Various hurricane apps are available from a collection Google put together.

15 safety tips that could save your life during a hurricane

Here are some safety tips emergency management and Federal Emergency Management Agency officials are offering that could save your life during a hurricane:Evacuation

1. If you are ordered to evacuate, you need to evacuate. The best way to stay safe is to be away from the storm's landfall. The orders to evacuate are issued based on historical flood maps and the strength of the storm.

2. A Category 5 hurricane will bring “catastrophic damage,” officials with the National Hurricane Center warn, adding that “a high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.”

3.  If you are in a mobile home, leave. Mobile homes will not survive a Category 5 hurricane.

4. Do not leave your pets at home, especially if they are outside.

If you stay

If you choose not to evacuate, or cannot leave, here are a few things you should do:

1. Get in a more secure room in your home – a closet or a bathroom without a window.

2. Stay on the bottom floor of your home unless water is rising.

3.  Do not go into your attic to escape rising water because you could get trapped. If you absolutely have to get in the attic to survive rising water, make sure you take an ax with you so you can cut a hole in the roof to escape.

4. If you are in an area that will flood, turn off electricity at the main breaker before water gets in your home to reduce the risk of electrocution.

5. Of course, do not try to go outside during the storm. Pieces of buildings, roofs, trees and other objects will be flying through the air.

6. Do not use candles as a light source – flashlights are what you need to use.

7. When you lose power, click here to see how you can use the internet.

During or after the storm

1. Do not use a generator during a storm.

2.  Never use portable generators inside a home, in your garage, in your basement or in a crawl space.

3. Generators produce carbon monoxide and if they are inside your house, your home can fill up with carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide will kill you if you breathe too much of it. If you are using a portable generator to power appliances in your home following the storm, make sure you have a carbon monoxide alarm. Appliances should be plugged directly into a generator. Do not hook the generator to your household electrical system. You can hurt yourself and kill utility workers when they begin to reconnect electricity to homes.

4. Do not get anywhere near standing water. It could contain live electric wires. If you come in contact with it, you could be electrocuted. If you see wires on the ground after the storm, assume they are live.

Here are some other tips from the Twitter feed of FloridaDisaster.org if you are evacuating or if you are staying home.

Gas buddy tracker

 The 5 ‘p’s of evacuation

 Don’t’ go farther than you have to

Don’t be scared, be prepared

9 weather terms you should know when preparing for a hurricane

Whenever a hurricane is poised to strike a region, there are several terms meteorologists use that might not be familiar.

>> Read more trending news

Here are common ones you should know as you keep your eye on the storm’s path: 

Feeder band

Lines or bands of low-level clouds that move (feed) into the upper region of a thunderstorm, usually from the east through south.

This term also is used in tropical meteorology to describe spiral-shaped bands of convection surrounding, and moving toward, the center of a tropical cyclone.

Squalls

When the wind speed increases to at least 16 knots and is sustained at 22 knots or more for at least one minute.

Storm surge

An abnormal rise in sea level accompanying a hurricane or other intense storm. The height is the difference between the normal level of the sea surface and the level that would have occurred in the absence of the cyclone. Storm surge is usually estimated by subtracting the normal or astronomic high tide from the observed storm tide.

>> Related: What is storm surge and why is it dangerous? 

Eye wall

An organized band or ring of clouds that surround the eye, or light-wind center, of a tropical cyclone. Eye wall and wall cloud are used synonymously.

Sustained winds

Wind speed determined by averaging observed values over a two-minute period.

Computer models

Meteorologists use computer models to figure out a storm’s path and its potential path. The models are based on typical weather patterns.

Advisory

Official information describing all tropical cyclone watches and warnings in effect along with details concerning tropical cyclone locations, intensity and movement, and precautions that should be taken.

Hurricane watch

An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are possible. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Hurricane warning

An announcement that sustained winds of 74 mph or higher are expected somewhere within the specified area in association with a cyclone. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the warning is issued 36 hours in advance. The warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or high water and waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.

Why you should never use a generator during a storm

If you are in a mandatory evacuation area, you need to leave. If you feel unsafe in your home,  you should get out. If you are making a decision to stay, safety in the home should obviously be your No. 1 priority.

For many, a portable generator feels like a guarantee of a semblance of normalcy following a storm. While it can keep refrigerators on and fans or a small air conditioner running, there are dangers associated with using it.

Here are some tips on generators and why you should never use one during a storm.

From the National Safety Council

1. Always read and follow the manufacturer's operating instructions before running generator.

2. Engines emit carbon monoxide. Never use a generator inside your home, garage, crawl space or other enclosed areas. Fatal fumes can build up, and neither a fan nor open doors and windows can provide enough fresh air. 

3. Only use your generator outdoors, away from open windows, vents, or doors. 

4. Use a battery-powered carbon monoxide detector in the area in which you’re running a generator. 

5. Gasoline and its vapors are extremely flammable. Allow the generator engine to cool at least two minutes before refueling, and always use fresh gasoline. If you do not plan to use your generator in 30 days, don’t forget to stabilize the gas with fuel stabilizer. 

6. Maintain your generator according to the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule for peak performance and safety. 

7. Never operate the generator near combustible materials. 

8. If you have to use extension cords, be sure they are of the grounded type and are rated for the application. Coiled cords can get extremely hot; always uncoil cords and lay them in flat, open locations. 

9. Never plug your generator directly into your home outlet. That’s known as “backfeeding” and puts people in risk of electrocution – especially utility workers trying to reconnect electric power after the storm.

10. Generators produce powerful voltage. Never operate under wet conditions. Take precautions to protect your generator from exposure to rain.

11. Plug appliances directly into the generator, or use a heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension cord that is rated, in watts or amps, at least equal to the sum of the connected appliance loads.  

 

How to use internet during a storm when your internet is down

If you are near the forecasted path of a hurricane and you fear the loss of communications that will come when power and internet service is disrupted, don’t worry.

While there’s not an app for that, there is a workaround, as long as you have cellular service.

During and after the storm, you may find that making phone calls becomes impossible, and that 3G and 4G internet service isn’t working, or at least not working well. The good news is that you may still be receiving text messages. 

A story from The Washington Post offers some tips on how to use Twitter in a situation where internet service is spotty. Twitter was originally a text-based service, so it lends itself well to such a use.

Here are a few other ways to keep in touch with the outside world:

Every phone has an email address, and every provider offers something called an email “gateway.” The gateway allows you to send and receive emails via the text message function on your phone.

Here, courtesy of HumanInet, is how to find your phone’s email address:

If you’re on Verizon, it’s yournumber@vtext.com (as in 5551234567@vtext.com), or if that doesn’t work, yournumber@vzwpix.com

If you’re on AT&T, it’s yournumber@txt.att.net, or if that doesn’t work yournumber@mms.att.net

If you’re on Sprint, it’s yournumber@messaging.sprintpcs.com

If you’re on T-Mobile, it’s yournumber@tmomail.net

(For other carriers, or to troubleshoot yours, check here.)

Once you have your gateway address, you’ll need to forward your email via SMS to that address.

To do that, go into “settings” in your phone and look for something like “add a forwarding address.” When you find that, type in your phone’s email address.

According to HumanInet, that method may not work on some phones. If you have a problem with your phone, you can use an automated forwarding service like TXTJet, they suggest.

If you want to send an email via text, you can enter you email address instead of a phone number.

If you want to get updates from Twitter accounts when the internet gets spotty, you can set up a SMS “Fast Follow.” You don’t even have to have a Twitter account to get updates from those you choose to follow.

You do this by texting “Follow (username)” to 40404. (Follow@nhc_atlantic to follow the National Hurricane Center, for instance).

You cannot use this function to post on Twitter, only to receive notices.

To post something on Twitter, the social media company says to do this:

Send a text to Twitter code [40404] with the word START.

Twitter will reply and ask you to text YES to the Twitter short code.

Text your username to the same number. Do not use the @ symbol or quotation marks. Send your username only. For example: larrybird

Next, text your password. This is case sensitive, so be sure you are sending your password correctly.

Then you can text messages to go out on your Twitter account.

If you can’t go without Facebook, even during a storm, activate Facebook via SMS by going to Facebook account settings and clicking “Mobile,” it’s on the left side of the page.

Turn on Facebook Message Forwarding and Notifications. After it’s set up, post by texting to 32665 or FBOOK.

You can even search Google by adding 466453 (GOOGLE) to your phonebook, then text to it to search.

Sources: Twitter, The Washington Post; HumanInet; Facebook; Google

 

Deputies: Couple cuts, steals $5K in powerlines from Florida neighborhood

A man and a woman were arrested Saturday on charges of stealing powerlines in a Florida neighborhood, according to the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office.

>> Read more trending news

According to an arrest report, the pair, identified as Charles Mahoy, 41, and Andrea Foster, 45, were in residents’ yards cutting down powerlines, and neighbors said they repeatedly asked the couple to leave.

The report said that when a deputy asked Mahoy about the situation, he replied that he was “just cutting up some of the powerline that was laying on the ground.”

Neighbors told deputies that Mahoy and Foster were loading the cut powerlines into a white truck, which authorities said they found parked near the homes.

Mahoy told deputies that the truck was his, authorities said.

Spools of powerline wire were loaded in the bed of the truck, deputies said.

>> Related: Stolen power pole on SUV catches police attention, 2 arrested

The report stated that Mahoy was “intentionally depriving the owner of the wire (Duke Energy) to their usage of the property in order to appropriate the property to his own use,” and that the “theft was facilitated by conditions created from Hurricane Irma.”

Mahoy said his house was damaged in the hurricane and he was cutting the wire because he needed money, and that he didn’t think it was stealing because the lines were on the ground, the report said.

The wire that was in the truck was valued at about $5,000, deputies said.

>> Read more Floridoh! Stories

The arrest report said deputies found what looked like methamphetamine and marijuana inside the truck. The drugs were located inside a Play-Doh container in the center-front storage compartment of the vehicle, deputies said.

A deputy also found a glass smoking pipe and a small amount of loose marijuana inside a purse in the vehicle, according to the report.

The pair also face drug and felony trespassing charges.

Mahoy had been out on bail on other trespassing charges when the arrest happened, authorities said.

Deputies said they are requesting that Mahoy’s bond be revoked and that he be placed on a no-bond status.

Authorities said that if released, they will formally request Mahoy be fitted with a GPS monitoring system due to his habitual and repeat violations of theft and burglaries.

Hulk Hogan Calls Irma Victims "Crybabies"

Hulk Hogan Calls Irma Victims "Crybabies"

Florida city commissioner saves neighbor's dog by throwing rock, brick at gator

A Florida man saved his neighbor’s dog from an alligator by throwing a rock and a brick at it.

>> Read more trending news

Bill Read, a fishing guide and Lakeland city commissioner, was cleaning his yard after Hurricane Irma when he saw ripples in the lake behind his home, according to Tampa Bay Online.

Read, 69, spotted his neighbor’s chocolate Labrador named Dixie unknowingly swimming in the water with an alligator. He tried to get the dog’s attention, but it didn’t work, Tampa Bay Online reported.

Right before Read’s eyes, the dog was pulled underwater as the gator wrapped its jaws around Dixie’s midsection. Seconds later Dixie emerged, but so did the gator, according to Tampa Bay Online.

That’s when Read threw the rock at the reptile’s side and then a brick at its head, causing the alligator to swim away, Tampa Bay Online reported. 

“I had to compose myself; it was kind of emotional,” Read told Tampa Bay Online.

Dixie came out of the water bleeding. She had two puncture wounds on her side and has to wear a plastic cone for a while. However, she will be OK, Tampa Bay Online reported.

Miami Nursing Home Owner Linked To Medicare Fraud Case

Miami Nursing Home Owner Linked To Medicare Fraud Case
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